Australian general practice registrars and their experience with postpartum consultations: A cross-sectional analysis of prevalence and associations.

A new interesting article has been published in Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2019 Jul 7. doi: 10.1111/ajo.13034. and titled:

Australian general practice registrars and their experience with postpartum consultations: A cross-sectional analysis of prevalence and associations.

Authors of this article are:

Hill S, Tapley A, van Driel ML, Holliday EG, Ball J, Davey A, Patsan I, Spike N, Fitzgerald K, Morgan S, Magin P.

A summary of the article is shown below:

BACKGROUND: In Australia, general practitioners (GPs) are recognised as an essential source of postpartum care. However, there remains a paucity of research pertaining to this, and in particular, to that of GP trainees (in Australia, termed ‘registrars’). Previous post-graduate experience in obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) is not a prerequisite for GP training, and thus, it is imperative that vocational training provides adequate exposure to postpartum consultations.AIM: To investigate the prevalence and associations of Australian GP registrars’ (trainees’) experience in postpartum care.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study employing data from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) project. ReCEnT is an ongoing cohort study where GP registrars record 60 consecutive consultations mid-way through each training term. The outcome variable was postpartum problem/diagnosis (compared to all other problems/diagnoses). The independent variables included registrar, practice, patient, consultation, clinical and educational factors. Analyses employed univariate and multivariable regression.RESULTS: Analysis included 2234 registrars (response rate 96.1%), 289 594 consultations, and 453 786 problems/diagnoses. Postpartum care (897) comprised 0.2% (95% CI: 0.19-0.21) of all problems/diagnoses in 0.3% (95% CI: 0.27-0.31) of all consultations. Significant multivariable associations included registrar’s gender (female) and obtainment of post-graduate O&G qualifications. Postpartum consultations were longer and resulted in more learning goals being generated.DISCUSSION: An overall low prevalence was established. Both male registrars, and those without pre-existing O&G qualifications, may have particularly limited experience. These findings should inform educational policy and practice regarding postpartum care experience in general practice training.© 2019 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

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This article is a good source of information and a good way to become familiar with topics such as: education;family practice;general practice;graduate;medical;postpartum period.

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